Tackling waste with Revive Leeds

After 5 months I’ve just finished working at the Revive Leeds re-use shop in Seacroft, and I wanted to pay credit to the work of this organisation, operating as it does – in my view – in very challenging circumstances.

Back in 2011, Leeds City Council refurbished the Seacroft Tip – rebranding it the East Leeds Household Waste Sorting Site – and as part of the refurbishment included the shell of a dedicated re-use shop. It then let a contract to find a third sector organisation to operate the shop. In response to this, 3 local charities – SLATE, St Vincent’s and Emmaus – jointly created a dedicated trading company with social aims, Revive Leeds CIC, and made a successful bid. In 2016, Revive won a similar contract at the refurbished Kirkstall waste site. With Emmaus pulling out shortly after, Revive now operates the 2 shops at Seacroft and Kirkstall, with any trading surplus divided equally between SLATE and St Vincent’s.

At both Seacroft and Kirkstall there is a dedicated car park with a Donations Point where the general public can drop off items directly at the shop. A wide range of items are accepted – furniture, electrical items, clothes, bric a brac, books, CDs/DVDs and more:

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Donations Point at Seacroft

My role at Seacroft, however, has been to complement the Donations Point by intercepting any re-usable items brought to the adjoining waste site, then transporting them to the shop.  This has involved working closely with Council staff at the waste site, which became a key part of my job.

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Another load of re-usable items intercepted at the waste site ready to be transported to the shop

Items brought to the shop by these 2 methods are then assessed, with those deemed suitable for re-sale going on the shop floor, and the remaining items disposed of in the most suitable skip at the waste site.

It’s worth highlighting the many benefits that arise from Revive’s work:

  • It is estimated that Revive diverts from disposal over 500 tonnes of items brought to the 2 waste sites per annum
  • It provides a convenient service for members of the public wishing to donate items for re-use. Where else in Leeds can you park so close and drop off such a wide range of items?
  • Numerous volunteering and employment opportunities are created.
  • Goods are made available for sale to the public at low cost.
  • Revive divides its tradings surplus equally between 2 local charities.

I feel it is also worth highlighting that these benefits arise despite Revive operating in a particularly challenging environment. Firstly, it is an entirely commercial environment, with Revive seeking to realise the greatest possible value from its stock in order to maximise the surplus for the 2 charities. All other costs, including rent and other charges to the Council, plus its own staffing costs, have to be covered first.

Secondly, the volume of donations is simply overwhelming. You give the general public the chance to easily get rid of stuff and they will bring it to you. But there is only limited space for it all to go, only a limited number of staff to deal with it all. Although Revive advertises a list of items it can’t accept (eg printers), there is still an overriding expectation from the public that Revive will accept pretty much anything. Some of the most difficult moments I found working there were telling people that we couldn’t accept their item – whether it was in good condition or not – simply on the grounds that it wouldn’t sell in the shop. No one wants to buy a plastic Christmas Tree in July, for example.

Sadly, and rather ironically, one of the symptoms of all this is that a regrettably large amount of perfectly re-usable, but lower value, items have to be disposed of. But somewhere like Revive can only do so much to address society’s ills. Perhaps one of Revive’s major, but unrecognised, benefits is that it does at least make people think twice about what they’re getting rid of, and what new stuff they’re buying in the first place. Ultimately, the responsibility for the amount of household waste out there falls on us, the consumer (and thus producers of waste), rather than the organisations that have to deal with it.

I am grateful to Revive Leeds for the opportunity to have worked for them, and spare a thought for my ex-colleagues who in the most part retain their good humour in the face of constant pressure. They provide a valuable service to residents of Leeds – shop customers and donators of items alike. Best of luck to Revive for the future.

One thought on “Tackling waste with Revive Leeds

  1. Pingback: Running diary – Sept 18 – Meanwood Rambler

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